The Warblers by Birds Canada

The Wake-up Call: Marbled Murrelet

October 25, 2022 Season 2 Episode 11
The Wake-up Call: Marbled Murrelet
The Warblers by Birds Canada
More Info
The Warblers by Birds Canada
The Wake-up Call: Marbled Murrelet
Oct 25, 2022 Season 2 Episode 11

The Marbled Murrelet keeps researchers on their toes. Their nests are tucked away in the mossy upper branches of old growth forests...the last place we'd ever expect to find a seabird! David joins us from British Columbia to shed some light on these fascinating birds; where you might spot one, the challenges they face, and how to help.

Get some Bird Friendly Certified Coffee to keep you warm and toasty this fall! 10% of your purchase from Birds and Beans goes towards supporting this podcast and bird conservation in Canada when you use this link.    
 
Dr. David Bradley
has spent a lifetime studying and appreciating birds; from Tree Swallows in Canada, to Kokako's in New Zealand, and everything in between. Currently, David is the British Columbia Director for Birds Canada. He is focusing on an invasive mammalian predator study in Haida Gwaii, and a Long-billed Curlew migration tracking study in the Kootenay Mountains.   

Andrea Gress studied Renewable Resource Management at the University of Saskatchewan. She pivoted towards birds, after an internship in South Africa. Upon returning, she worked with Piping Plovers in Saskatchewan and now coordinates the Ontario Piping Plover Conservation Program for Birds Canada. Follow her work at @ontarioplovers

Andrés Jiménez is a Costa Rican wildlife biologist with a keen interest in snakes, frogs, birds and how human relationships are interconnected with the living world. He studied Tropical Biology in Costa Rica and has a Masters in Environmental Problem Solving from York University. Follow him at @andresjimo

This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change is supported by funding from Environment and Climate Change Canada. The views expressed herein are solely those of Birds Canada.

Show Notes Transcript

The Marbled Murrelet keeps researchers on their toes. Their nests are tucked away in the mossy upper branches of old growth forests...the last place we'd ever expect to find a seabird! David joins us from British Columbia to shed some light on these fascinating birds; where you might spot one, the challenges they face, and how to help.

Get some Bird Friendly Certified Coffee to keep you warm and toasty this fall! 10% of your purchase from Birds and Beans goes towards supporting this podcast and bird conservation in Canada when you use this link.    
 
Dr. David Bradley
has spent a lifetime studying and appreciating birds; from Tree Swallows in Canada, to Kokako's in New Zealand, and everything in between. Currently, David is the British Columbia Director for Birds Canada. He is focusing on an invasive mammalian predator study in Haida Gwaii, and a Long-billed Curlew migration tracking study in the Kootenay Mountains.   

Andrea Gress studied Renewable Resource Management at the University of Saskatchewan. She pivoted towards birds, after an internship in South Africa. Upon returning, she worked with Piping Plovers in Saskatchewan and now coordinates the Ontario Piping Plover Conservation Program for Birds Canada. Follow her work at @ontarioplovers

Andrés Jiménez is a Costa Rican wildlife biologist with a keen interest in snakes, frogs, birds and how human relationships are interconnected with the living world. He studied Tropical Biology in Costa Rica and has a Masters in Environmental Problem Solving from York University. Follow him at @andresjimo

This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change is supported by funding from Environment and Climate Change Canada. The views expressed herein are solely those of Birds Canada.

SPEAKERS

Andrés Jiménez, David Bradley, Andrea Gress

 

Andrea Gress  00:01

Welcome to another episode of the wake up call. Today we're learning about another elusive bird. Much like the Bicknell's Thrush many of us may go our entire lives without seeing this species, the Marbled Murrelet, which makes it challenging to understand and fully appreciate how our day to day actions are impacting them. Like all of our wake up call episodes, we're joined by an expert who's working to protect the species. And together we're trying to figure out what we can all do to help this bird. Today, Andres and I are joined by David Bradley, who is based in beautiful British Columbia. David, so nice to have you with us to tell us all about the Marble Murrelet. 

 

David Bradley  00:40

My pleasure to talk about why I'm here and it's one of my favorite birds on the coast here. And it's mostly because murrelets are a cute little bird but also because they're so elusive. They're not a bird that people see very often unless you are out in a boat, which most people aren't, then you generally won't see them. They only come to the coast to breed or in land to breed otherwise they have to see they're just adorable little, I hate to say analogous to ducks, but they float on the water and they're sea birds. But they're not ducks, let's be honest, they're not ducks. 

 

Andrea Gress  01:10

What made you first discover them and fall in love with them?

 

David Bradley  01:14

Well, it was through a whale watching trip actually from Tofino when I was about 17. Yeah, so I was very lucky that I got to see A be on a whale. 

 

Andrés Jiménez  01:24

We were super young. 

 

David Bradley  01:25

Yes, yeah, I visited when I was when I was teenager, before I lived in Canada actually have visited and went on a boat trip. And being a birdwatcher, I had to have my binoculars in my hands, of course. And yeah we saw some Marbled Murrelets then. And I've seen that seldom times since then, occasionally, from the coast, you can see them there's several sites around Vancouver, you can see them from the coast. Most recently, I was out on a boat from Campbell River, and we saw a few of them swimming past. But yeah, they're quite elusive, difficult to see.

 

Andrea Gress  01:51

And now, you kind of advocate for them. Could you tell us a bit about your role with Birds Canada?

 

David Bradley  01:58

I'm very lucky to be the director of the British Columbia office of Birds Canada and out here on the West Coast. And I guess from a programming perspective we engage with with Marbled Murrelets through our coastal water boats survey. So that's a long term, a long running survey. It's been running now for over 20-22 years, I think. And so we have volunteers up and down the coast to collect data on seabirds, and Marbled Murrelets is one of those seabirds. So there are a few sites where they get seen quite frequently. But there are many sites where they don't get seen. We know that they're not everywhere. And they're they're definitely out there though.

 

Andrés Jiménez  02:32

I knew nothing about Marbled Murrelets until I started preparing for this episode.

 

David Bradley  02:37

I'm not surprised that you've never seen or heard of the species because that most people don't get to see it. They're quite elusive.

 

Andrés Jiménez  02:44

Make the most awesome visual image of a Marbled Murrelet for us. 

 

David Bradley  02:51

They're really cute. I would describe that but small like a small duck. Basically, they're a seabird and the winter period, the plumage is black and white. Generally it's white underneath and black on top with a very noticeable white wing patch. In the summer, they molt into very different plumage, though they got their namesake marbling. And they're basically brown with white marbling patches throughout the body, they're beautiful little birds and what is cute about them is that they're usually seen in pairs. So people who do see them often relate in that sense that they're not usually in gregarious groups, they tend to associate just with their pair member. And then you see a pair of little birds, black and white birds during the winter, floating around and most likely they will be Marbled Murrelets.

 

Andrés Jiménez  03:33

Tell me about their faces because there are many faces of seabirds, and I can't I struggled to picture this one. How would you best describe their face?

 

David Bradley  03:41

Black on top and white underneath, have a black patch around the eye. And they're very pointed beak, sort of conical shape. Usually that white patch is the most distinctive part of their body, the throat and the neck and going down to the underside of the bird.

 

Andrés Jiménez  03:56

And how big are they are they like a football? 

 

David Bradley  03:59

Yeah, about the size of football. So if you know what a Green-wing Teal is a Green-wing Teal is small bird you see on the in wetlands, especially here on the west coast to they're about the size of a Green-wing Teal, a small duck basically less than 30 centimeters about 25 centimeters long, and have very short wings that they use to power underwater almost like a imagine a penguin swimming underwater. Well, that's similar to a Marbled Murrelet. The murres are a species of Alcides in northern hemisphere. They're basically the equivalent of penguins you find up here.

 

Andrés Jiménez  04:29

Before you tell me what Alcides are. I'm imagining somewhat of a grouse in the water. I think that's what I'm imagining the closest mental picture that comes to me.

 

David Bradley  04:38

Well, they're not a perching bird. So you wouldn't see them like a Robin. They tend to be they float like a duck. I hate using that analogy of a duck because they're not ducks at all. But they do

 

Andrea Gress  04:48

Maybe like like a puffin?

 

David Bradley  04:51

Yes, everyone knows a puffin and like a smaller version of a puffin.

 

Andrés Jiménez  04:54

Tell us about the alcides.

 

David Bradley  04:56

Oh Alcides are an amazing group. So the murres and murrelets they're basically usually cliff-nesting seabirds or burrow nesting seabirds on some islands, and they usually breed in large colonies to avoid predators, however, the Marbled Murrelet is quite an enigma in this group because they, as I mentioned, they're very solitary and they don't nest on cliffs or an islands. They're really an intriguing group because they usually occur in cold waters, and they feed on fish, mostly the small ones might feed on zooplankton, for example, but usually it's fish species they feed on.

 

Andrea Gress  05:27

Say, you know, you're not going to see them unless you're out on a boat. Likely. Are they mostly on the west coast of Canada? Or where exactly do they live?

 

David Bradley  05:37

Well, they're all around that the circumpolar regions of the world, so mostly in the northern hemisphere. So you find puffins in Europe, for example. And on the east coast of Canada, the classic puffins North Atlantic, on the west coast, you get horned puffins and tufted puffins and that's most most commonly known species of alcide the puffins, guillemots or murres, as you call them in North America are another species that that's quite common around the northern hemisphere.

 

Andrea Gress  06:01

And the Marbled Murrelets themselves, are they just in Canada? Do they extend out to a wide range as well?

 

David Bradley  06:08

Their range is from all the way up in northern Alaska down to Central California on the West Coast. Quite a broad range.

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:14

So but in Canada, they wouldn't they would only be found in British Columbia?

 

David Bradley  06:18

That's correct. You don't find them inland. 

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:21

And where in British Columbia, will you be able to find a Marbled Murrelet that is not on a boat?

 

David Bradley  06:26

During the summer period, that's when they breed. And unlike the other birds that I described before that nest on islands these birds nest, inland, usually up to 30 kilometers inland, and they nest in a very special place. So they're very particular in nesting on tall old growth trees, tall coniferous trees.

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:45

This seems to be very specific, like a seabird nesting in not any tree, but old growth trees. When was it that we discovered that they nest in trees?

 

David Bradley  06:56

Well, that's one of the really cool things about Marbled Murrelets. We didn't know where they nest it for a long, long time. You know, we knew about all these other birds nests. I think Black Swift was another species that we didn't know where they nested, but no one had any idea. And there was lots of searching for the nest. And because they're so discreet, and careful about where they approach their nesting sites, so people generally wouldn't see them. They usually don't visit their nests until nighttime. And so unless you're standing there in the forest waiting, and you have to see them approaching the nest at night, with night vision goggles or something that you generally wouldn't see them. So it wasn't till the 60s and 70s, that their nests were found, which is phenomenal. And you realize that nearly all other bird species's nests had been described in North America until that point.

 

Andrea Gress  07:38

And would they make sounds like would you hear that their nesting near you?

 

David Bradley  07:41

Not really, no, their vocalizations are generally not made frequently. They're very discreet, and they do that for a reason. They're really trying to avoid those raptors, such as peregrine falcons and eagles, and crows and ravens. Those are the main predators that you find feeding on the species. They generally want to nest in places or the tops of these coniferous trees. They bought mossy platforms at very tall trees there to get that clear line of sight where they can see predators approaching, or they can jump out of their nests and glide into a flying position.

 

Andrés Jiménez  08:13

For many listeners, it sounds normal for a bird to nest in a tree. But for those listeners that know, seabirds, you will know that this is incredibly rare, the majority of seabird colonies are on the ground in isolated islands or by the coast, not really on huge, old growth trees, which makes me think, David, is this unique among their family members? Among the alcides, like only Marbled Murrelets do this?

 

08:43

I believe so yeah, I believe that's the only species of Alcides that the breeding tree.

 

Andrea Gress  08:47

There any speculation as to just let you figure predation. But is there any other speculation as to why these birds would have evolved this way?

 

David Bradley  08:56

It makes sense that they would be avoiding predation by nesting in these trees. Also, you want to be a certain humidity level. And that would be more away from wind, for example, that might dry out their nesting platform. And also it's a place where it without wind and that they're not subject to extreme temperature fluctuations. You know, the forest, generally constant temperature, so that'd be a reason to nest in a forest.

 

Andrea Gress  09:19

I love an old growth forest. Like that. Still, it's moist and kind of cool and quiet. Yeah. Oh, yeah. They picked a good spot to nest.

 

Andrés Jiménez  09:30

Everyone should be searching right now how it looks how a Marbled Murrelet nest looks like because it looks like a fairy tale. Like they all the drawings and images I've seen is of their nest in this stump in a huge tree, completely covered on moss and then just them sitting there. It's the most one of the most beautiful nests I've seen. How are Marbled Murrelets faring in Canada.

 

David Bradley  09:55

Not Well, unfortunately, they're threatened on the endangered species list. IUCN treats them as endangered. That's because the populations are not doing well. You know, Canada has about a quarter of the world population. I think the majority are up on the West Coast of the US. But Canada population is not doing well. We know that they've been declining for a number of years. And a lot of effort has been put into trying to figure out what we can do to try and cease that decline, but unsuccessfully, unfortunately, they've continued decline.

 

Andrea Gress  10:24

You said there's so elusive and evasive how how do we know what their populations doing?

 

David Bradley  10:31

Well, that's a hard thing to get a figure on. I mean, you can count them at sea, which is something that we hope to be more involved in. This has been done a lot in the past. And then they try and attract some of them using radar technology. So in these fjords, or it's coming from the coast, where frequently the birds will gather before they approach the nesting site, they often have some radar sites set up and actually try and count them as they come in those then that's a way of getting a census of the population. But of course, we don't truly know how many birds are out there.

 

Andrea Gress  11:00

And what are their biggest threats?

 

David Bradley  11:02

Like most birds its habitat loss. And because their habitat is old growth forest, their breeding habitat, then the loss of old growth forest is definitely the biggest threat that they have. In fact, if you look at the reduction in old growth forests in British Columbia, which the past 30 years, it's been about 20 to 30% loss of old growth forests that mirrors the loss of the murrelet population which is almost a perfect match. It's a pretty strong indication that that's what's causing the decline. There are other threats of species as well. You know, oiling at sea is a big threat to birds during the wintertime, especially when they're not breeding. Climate changes is always something that's threatening bird populations, primarily because a lot of their forest sites would be perhaps warming up which make it difficult for to maintain those mossy, moist nesting platforms. And also we know that the overfishing is a big issue as well because they feed on baitfish. So capelin, for example, small herring or salmon, young salmon species. A reduction in those would lead to reduction habitat. So prey loss for the Marbled Murrelet. So there are a number of threats facing this primarily facing this species primarily its old growth forest.

 

Andrés Jiménez  12:11

Contrary to other species that we've reviewed, like Leech's Storm Petral and Piping Plovers, which have many, many different causes for their decline. There is one pretty clear cause that its even mirroring the decline of the Marbled Murrelets. And that is the cutting of the old growth forest. Can you elaborate or tell us a bit more of the context of this old growth forest logging that is happening in British Columbia?

 

David Bradley  12:39

It has been a contentious issue in British Columbia for many decades. Up in Haida Gwaii there are a number of protests in the past about the extent of old growth logging. And recently, of course, there was a quite strong protest against that which got a lot of international attention. People realize that, you know, safeguarding these old growth forests has a lot of strong importance not only for the species like Marbled Murrelets, but also for the invertebrates that might live in that forest and for cultural collections that indigenous people have for this forest as well. So it's a very contentious issue in British Columbia, the provincial government has been put under a lot of pressure to defer a lot of this logging concessions, but that's only a temporary, a temporary deferral.

 

Andrés Jiménez  13:18

Every time I hear you speak about British Columbia reminds me of the of the tropical forests in Costa Rica right with this 30-40 high up metres tree and super thick, completely covering moss and epiphytes and full of life. And you've provided another piece of the image for me, and that is that connection to indigenous peoples, and how the Haidas are connected to this old growth forest, Marbled Murrelets, and indigenous people care, use, and live in this old growth forest. And are they indigenous connections to this species conservation efforts?

 

13:56

There are probably spiritual connections, I don't think there are any economic connections or sustenance connections, there's not really any evidence that they were consumed widely, primarily because the species is not, it's quite elusive. And there's not that much meat on them. So they're not they weren't harvested traditionally. But if you look at the management plans, a lot of nations have, especially, for example, the Haida it's clear indication that it's an important cultural species because they often use that as an umbrella species to protect, protect land, and they are great umbrella species because they they encompass a lot of the ecosystem, not only themselves, but also the as I mentioned, the invertebrates and the tree species that might be growing there, they're all under the same umbrella. The sense in the conservation perspective, yes.

 

Andrea Gress  14:46

Yeah, you protect one species and it covers a whole bunch of other things.

 

Andrés Jiménez  14:51

Including people, including people have indigenous people joined the conservation of Marbled Murrelets?

 

David Bradley  14:58

There's a very strong connection to land and they definitely want to protect it, old growth forest because it means a lot to them.

 

Andrea Gress  15:05

If everything went the way you'd like to see it and Marbled Murrelets are fully protected, that would have a lot of positive spin offs, right? Like what other benefits would we see?

 

David Bradley  15:15

Well, a lot of animals require these old growth forests. You know, you look at grizzly bears, for example, which are very important for indigenous nations and one for tourism, for example, and a very important part of the ecosystem, they will be protected as well by these old growth forests there are other species as well, such as Western Screech Owl. So a good example that uses all growth forests. And many of the mammal species as well like old growth forests. Another good species is the Northern Goshawk, the subspecies you find on the coast here, they require large old trees. So to protect Marbled Murrelets through the reduction in old growth forest loss, and you protect a number of different other species on the coast too.

 

Andrea Gress  15:56

So to really get conservation of murrelets fully fully in swing, who would be the main actors to get that really going?

 

David Bradley  16:06

I think working with indigenous people is very important. So encouraging the protection and research into why declines are happening and ways that we can try and reduce that loss is important to engaging with First Nations on that, of course, a lot of the fishing industry needs to be engaged, because if they're harvesting fish too much there needs to be, I don't say told what to do, but they need to be informed about what the issues are. And I know the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, obviously is keeping track of that. And government agencies, agencies, as well as looking very closely at this not only the federal government, but also the provincial government. They've had a Marbled Murrelet recovery plan in place for a number of years. And so they're really ramping up the the reduction in loss of the species, primarily is old growth forest I mentioned before. So that's, that's how you answered the question really, is to stop logging down, logging their habitat.

 

Andrea Gress  16:58

Those are all really, really big. You know, looking at big industry and big, big influencers. What about the individuals? How can they help the species?

 

David Bradley  17:09

Yeah, that's a good question. What can the listeners now do to protect the species? It's a contentious issue, as I mentioned before, you don't necessarily have to get out and protest, but you can lobby your you know, your, your local MLA, or your, your MP or something, write them a letter and tell them what birds like Marbled Murrelets mean to you, and what they might mean to indigenous groups, and why they should be protected and why old growth forest should not be cut down, you can, you can always do that. 

 

Andrés Jiménez  17:36

You've told us the story of this rare to see species that spends a lot of its time in the ocean that, of course gets in contact with fishing gear, and oil spills. And then when it comes back to the coast, it comes back to this fairy garden of giant trees to nest among the moss. And that there is a very clear indication that cutting down those huge trees, of course, is going to affect them because they wouldn't have anywhere to nest. What is the main lesson that this species taught you and is teaching us about how we do conservation, or how we relate to wildlife?

 

David Bradley  18:23

I think a balance is important. It's important to recognize that there's there's always going to be threats coming from whether it's threats, of logging industry or threats to forests from logging. And it's easy enough to say well stop doing this and do that. But I think just having open dialogue and discussion about ways that that you can protect culture and where you can protect the economy in ways that you can protect the birds, and the forest without trashing any one of those things. This is an issue that's been faced and that government has been facing for many, many decades. So if it was easy, they would just have done it already.

 

Andrés Jiménez  18:59

Andrea what about you, what did you get out of this story?

 

Andrea Gress  19:02

What's really interesting with the species is how you'd mentioned that we didn't know they nest it in trees until, you know, like the 60s/70s. And that makes me think about these big ecosystems that we think we know everything about, but maybe don't. And there's potentially a lot going on that we don't fully understand. And when we work to protect a species, we're probably doing so much more for that ecosystem than we even realize.

 

Andrés Jiménez  19:28

In my case, David has just set a quote, a phrase that really brought this home to me, he said, It's easy enough to say don't do that. I've thought of so many times. I've said don't do that when it comes to a conservation issue. But it is very hard when you're the one that depends on that logging to survive, right. And so it makes me think that we know so clearly, that this is the issue that is threatening this species and the answer can be so clear as well. But so hard to pull off so hard to do that I'm I'm hopeful that many people listening to this will take action on how they consume wooded and products on the how they find sustainable wood, and on how we support the communities that are linked to this products in order for them to make a living.

 

David Bradley  20:24

Yeah, you mentioned a very, very important point Andres, you know, making sure that the wood products that you purchase are certified as being sustainably harvested. And in some way that's a renewable rather than cutting down old growth, or is that not really a renewable resource, it takes so long for these to grow longer than the life that the plant actually to regrow, because their whole ecosystem has to reform, not just the tree itself. So it can take a long time to replace them. And so if you're purchasing wood products, whether it's tables or paper, for example, definitely try and use sources that are sustainable. Purchasing old growth forests, purchasing products made from old growth forests is not a good thing.

 

Andrea Gress  21:09

Thank you so much for joining us, David. I loved learning about this species. And I hope that maybe one day I'll be able to get out to BC and go on a boat trip with you. And we could go and track some down.

 

David Bradley  21:18

Absolutely. I know. There's several of them. Actually, if you come out here, they're not easy to find in Vancouver, you gotta tend to go further away, but I can take you guys out if you come.

 

Andrés Jiménez  21:25

Can you show me a bear in the process? 

 

David Bradley  21:29

Oh, that's tricky. I'm sure if we got further north up the northern part of the Salish Sea, you can find bears. Yes.

 

Andrea Gress  21:34

All right road trip.

 

Andrés Jiménez  21:35

Thank you, David.

 

David Bradley  21:36

You're very well have a good day. 

 

Andrea Gress  21:40

Before we go, I wanted to just take a moment to thank a reviewer. We just got a really really awesome review. I'm going to read it out because I love it. It says "I love the Canadian content. In this podcast. The episode about planting a bird garden was the push I needed to take out a section of front lawn and add some plants for birds. Today I planted a Red Osier dogwood, Wild Columbine, Stiff Goldenrod and some native prairie grasses. So excited to see who shows up at my feeders next year." Ah, like what an incredible review. Thank you so much for leaving that. And please everybody else if you've had positive bird actions in your life as a result of this podcast or any other programs or volunteering gigs that you're involved in, let us know we want to hear feedback on social media leave reviews on your podcasting platforms. Subscribe, all that good stuff. It really helps us keep this podcast going and keep the support up. So thank you. Hope to hear more of these great stories.

_____
En français

Andrea Gress  00:01

Bienvenue à un autre épisode de la série «The Wakeup Call». Aujourd’hui, nous allons apprendre à connaître un autre oiseau insaisissable. Tout comme dans le cas de la Grive de Bicknell, beaucoup d'entre nous peuvent passer toute leur vie sans voir cet oiseau, le Guillemot marbré, ce qui rend difficile de comprendre et d'apprécier pleinement l'effet de nos actions quotidiennes sur cette espèce. Comme dans tous nos épisodes de cette série, nous sommes accompagnés d'un expert qui travaille à la protection de l'espèce. Et ensemble, nous essayons de trouver ce que nous pouvons faire pour aider cet oiseau. Aujourd'hui, Andres et moi recevons la visite de David Bradley, qui vit dans la belle province de la Colombie-Britannique. David, c'est un plaisir de vous avoir avec nous pour nous parler du Guillemot marbré.

 

David Bradley  00:40

J'ai le plaisir de vous parler de la raison de ma présence ici. C'est l'un de mes oiseaux préférés sur la côte. Et c'est surtout parce que les guillemots sont de petits oiseaux mignons, mais aussi parce qu'ils sont si insaisissables. Ce ne sont pas des oiseaux que les gens voient très souvent, sauf si vous êtes en bateau, ce qui n'est pas le cas de la plupart des gens, alors vous ne les verrez généralement pas. Ils ne viennent sur la terre ferme que pour se reproduire, sinon il faut les voir, ce sont d'adorables petits oiseaux aquatiques. Je déteste les assimiler à des canards, mais ils flottent sur l'eau et ce sont des oiseaux de mer. Mais ce ne sont pas des canards, soyons honnêtes, ce ne sont pas des canards.

 

Andrea Gress  01:10

Comment les avez-vous découverts et comment avez-vous succombé à leurs charmes?

 

David Bradley  01:14

Eh bien, c’est à l’occasion d’une excursion d’observation de baleines à partir de Tofino. J’avais environ 17 ans. Oui, j’ai été très chanceux d’observer des guillemots à cette occasion.

 

Andrés Jiménez  01:24

Vous étiez si jeune!

 

David Bradley  01:25

Oui, oui, j’étais en visite au Canada quand j'étais adolescent, avant de vivre au Canada en fait, j'ai participé à une excursion en bateau. Et comme j’étais ornithologue amateur, j’avais bien sûr mes jumelles à la main. Et oui, nous avons vu des Guillemots marbrés à ce moment-là. Et je n'en ai vu que rarement depuis, à l’occasion, depuis la côte. Vous pouvez les voir, il y a plusieurs sites autour de Vancouver, vous pouvez les voir depuis la côte. Plus récemment, j'étais sur un bateau à partir de Campbell River, et nous en avons vu quelques-uns passer à la nage. Mais oui, ce sont des oiseaux assez furtifs, difficiles à voir.

 

Andrea Gress  01:51

Et maintenant, vous plaidez leur cause en quelque sorte. Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu de votre rôle au sein d’Oiseaux Canada?

 

David Bradley  01:58

J'ai la chance d'être directeur des programmes en Colombie-Britannique pour Oiseaux Canada, ici sur la côte ouest. Dans le cadre de nos programmes, nous effectuons des relevés à partir de bateaux et nous nous occupons ainsi des Guillemots marbrés. Il s'agit donc d'un relevé à long terme, qui existe depuis plus de 20, 22 ans, je pense. Nous avons donc des bénévoles le long de la côte pour récolter des données sur les oiseaux de mer, et le Guillemot marbré est l'un de ces oiseaux. Il y a donc quelques sites où ils sont vus assez fréquemment. Mais il y a beaucoup de sites où on ne les voit pas. Nous savons qu'ils ne sont pas partout. Mais ils sont bel et bien là.

 

Andrés Jiménez  02:32

Je ne savais rien des Guillemots marbrés avant de commencer à préparer cet épisode.

 

David Bradley  02:37

Je ne suis pas surpris que vous n'ayez jamais vu ou entendu parler de cette espèce, car la plupart des gens n'ont pas l'occasion de la voir. C’est un oiseau assez insaisissable.

 

Andrés Jiménez  02:44

S’il vous plait, pour nous et pour nos auditeurs, pourriez-vous présenter une description la plus parlante possible du Guillemot marbré?

 

David Bradley  02:51

C’est un oiseau très mignon. Je dirais qu'il est petit, comme un petit canard. En fait, c’est un oiseau de mer et en hiver, son plumage est noir et blanc. En général, le dessous est blanc et le dessus noir, avec une tache blanche très visible sur l'aile. En été, son plumage devient très différent, bien qu'il conserve les marbrures qui lui donnent son nom. Ce sont de magnifiques petits oiseaux, et ce qui est mignon chez eux, c'est qu'on les voit généralement en couple. Les gens qui les voient constatent qu'ils ne forment généralement pas de grandes congrégations, ils ont tendance à vivre uniquement en couple. Si vous voyez un couple de petits oiseaux, des oiseaux noirs et blancs, pendant l'hiver, qui flottent autour de vous, il s'agit très probablement de Guillemots marbrés.

 

Andrés Jiménez  03:33

Parlez-nous de leur face, car les oiseaux marins ont beaucoup de faces différentes selon les espèces. J’ai du mal à me représenter la face du Guillemot marbré. Comment la décririez-vous?

 

David Bradley  03:41

Le haut de la face noir et le bas blanc, avec une tache noire autour des yeux. Et leur bec est très pointu, de forme conique. Habituellement, la bande blanche qui court de la gorge vers la nuque est la partie la plus distinctive du corps. Et tout ce blanc s’étend jusque sur le dessous de l’oiseau.

 

Andrés Jiménez  03:56

Et est-il bien gros, comme un ballon de football?

 

David Bradley  03:59

Oui, à peu près de la taille d'un ballon de football. Donc, si vous savez ce qu'est une Sarcelle d'hiver, une Sarcelle d'hiver est un petit oiseau que vous voyez dans les zones humides, surtout ici sur la côte ouest. Or le Guillemot marbré est à peu près de la grosseur d'une Sarcelle d'hiver, un petit canard de moins de 30 centimètres de long, d’environ 25 centimètres de long, et ils ont des ailes très courtes qu'ils utilisent pour se déplacer sous l'eau, presque comme un manchot qui nage sous l'eau. Eh bien, ça ressemble à un Guillemot marbré. Les guillemots sont une espèce d'Alcidés présente dans l'hémisphère Nord. Ils sont en gros l'équivalent des manchots.

 

Andrés Jiménez  04:29

Avant que vous m’expliquiez ce que sont les Alcidés… Je me représente ce guillemot comme une Gélinotte huppée dans l’eau. C’est l’image la plus proche qui me vient à l’esprit.

 

David Bradley  04:38

Eh bien, ce n'est pas un oiseau qui se perche. Donc vous ne pouvez pas vous le représenter comme un Merle d’Amérique. Il a tendance à flotter comme un canard. Je déteste utiliser l'analogie du canard, car ce n’est pas du tout un canard. Mais il lui ressemble.

 

Andrea Gress  04:48

Peut-être comme un macareux?

 

David Bradley  04:51

Oui, tout le monde connaît les macareux, c’est comme une version réduite d’un macareux.

 

Andrés Jiménez  04:54

Parlez-nous des Alcidés.

 

David Bradley  04:56

Les Alcidés sont un groupe incroyable. Les oiseaux de cette famille sont à la base des oiseaux de mer qui nichent sur des falaises ou dans des terriers sur certaines îles, et ils se reproduisent généralement en grandes colonies pour éviter les prédateurs. Toutefois, le Guillemot marbré est une énigme dans ce groupe parce que, comme je l'ai dit, il est très solitaire et ne niche pas sur des falaises ou des îles. Ils forment vraiment un groupe intriguant parce qu'ils se trouvent généralement dans les eaux froides et qu'ils se nourrissent de poissons, surtout les petits, qui peuvent se nourrir de zooplancton, par exemple, mais généralement ce sont des espèces de poissons dont ils se nourrissent.

 

Andrea Gress  05:27

Vous savez, vous ne les verrez pas à moins d'être sur un bateau. Probablement. Sont-ils principalement sur la côte ouest du Canada? Où vivent-ils exactement?

 

David Bradley  05:37

Eh bien, on les trouve partout dans les régions circumpolaires du monde, donc principalement dans l'hémisphère Nord. On trouve des macareux en Europe, par exemple. Et sur la côte est du Canada, les macareux classiques de l'Atlantique Nord. Sur la côte ouest, on voit les Macareux cornus et les Macareux huppés, ce sont les espèces les plus connues de la famille des Alcidés. Les guillemots ou les marmettes, comme on les appelle en Amérique du Nord, sont d’autres espèces assez communes dans l'hémisphère Nord.

 

Andrea Gress  06:01

Et les Guillemots marbrés, est-ce qu’ils sont juste au Canada? Est-ce que leur aire de répartition est plus vaste?

 

David Bradley  06:08

Leur aire de répartition s’étend du nord de l’Alaska jusqu’au centre de la Californie sur la côte ouest. Elle est très vaste.

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:14

Mais au Canada, est-ce qu’ils se trouvent seulement en Colombie-Britannique?

 

David Bradley  06:18

Oui, c’est exact. On ne les trouve pas dans l’intérieur des terres.

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:21

Et où, en Colombie-Britannique, pourrez-vous trouver un Guillemot marbré si vous n’êtes pas en bateau?

 

David Bradley  06:26

On peut en voir ailleurs pendant l’été, pendant la période de reproduction. Et contrairement aux autres oiseaux de la famille des Alcidés, lesquels nichent sur des îles et des falaises, les Guillemots marbrés nichent à l'intérieur des terres, généralement jusqu'à 30 kilomètres de la côte, et ils nichent dans des endroits très spéciaux. Ils sont donc très particuliers et nichent sur de grands arbres anciens, de grands conifères.

 

Andrés Jiménez  06:45

Ça semble très spécial, en effet, comme un oiseau de mer qui niche non pas dans n'importe quel arbre, mais dans des arbres anciens. Quand a-t-on découvert qu'ils nichent dans des arbres?

 

David Bradley  06:56

C'est un des aspects les plus intéressants des Guillemots marbrés. Pendant très, très longtemps on ne savait pas où ils faisaient leurs nids. Vous savez, on connaissait les nids de tous ces autres oiseaux. Je pense que le Martinet sombre était une autre espèce dont on ne savait pas où elle nichait; personne n'en avait la moindre idée. Et on faisait beaucoup de recherches pour trouver le nid. Et parce qu'ils sont si discrets, et prudents quant à l'approche de leurs sites de nidification, les gens ne les voient généralement pas. Ces guillemots ne visitent généralement pas leurs nids avant la nuit. Donc, à moins d'attendre dans la forêt et de les voir s'approcher du nid la nuit, avec des lunettes de vision nocturne ou autre, on ne les voit généralement pas. Ce n'est que dans les années 1960 et 1970 que leurs nids ont été découverts, ce qui est phénoménal. Et on réalise que presque tous les nids des autres espèces d'oiseaux avaient été décrits en Amérique du Nord jusqu'à ce moment-là.

 

Andrea Gress  07:38

Est-ce qu’ils émettent des sons, peut-on les entendre nicher à proximité?

 

David Bradley  07:41

Non, pas vraiment. En général, ils ne vocalisent pas souvent. Ils sont très discrets, et pour une bonne raison. Ils essaient vraiment d'éviter les rapaces, comme les Faucons pèlerins et les aigles, ainsi que les corbeaux et les corneilles. Ce sont les principaux prédateurs qui se nourrissent de l'espèce. Ils veulent généralement nicher au sommet de ces conifères. Ils construisent des plateformes en mousses au sommet de très grands arbres afin d'avoir un champ de vision clair leur permettant de voir les prédateurs s'approcher, où ils peuvent sortir de leurs nids et se mettre en position de vol.

 

Andrés Jiménez  08:13

Pour beaucoup d’auditeurs, il semble normal qu'un oiseau fasse son nid dans un arbre. Mais pour ceux qui connaissent les oiseaux de mer, vous savez que c'est incroyablement rare, la majorité des colonies d'oiseaux de mer sont sur le sol, dans des îles isolées ou sur la côte, et pas vraiment dans des arbres immenses et anciens. Ce qui me fait penser, David, est-ce unique parmi les membres de leur famille? Parmi les Alcidés, les Guillemots marbrés sont-ils les seuls dans ce cas?

 

08:43

Je pense, oui. Je pense que c’est la seule espèce de la famille des Alcidés qui niche dans des arbres.

 

Andrea Gress  08:47

Y aurait-il une autre raison que le risque de prédation pour expliquer ce phénomène? Y aurait-il d’autres raisons pour lesquelles ces oiseaux ont évolué de cette façon?

 

David Bradley  08:56

Il est logique qu'ils évitent les prédateurs en nichant dans ces arbres. De plus, il faut un certain taux d'humidité. Et ce serait plus loin du vent, par exemple, qui pourrait assécher leur plateforme de nidification. Et aussi c'est un endroit où il n'y a pas de vent et qu'ils ne sont pas soumis à des fluctuations extrêmes de température. Vous savez, dans la forêt, la température est généralement constante, ce serait donc une raison de nicher dans une forêt.

 

Andrea Gress  09:19

J'aime les vieilles forêts. Comme celles-là. C'est quand même humide, frais et calme. Ouais. Oh, oui. Ils ont choisi un bon endroit pour nicher.

 

Andrés Jiménez  09:30

Tout le monde devrait chercher en ce moment à quoi ressemble un nid de Guillemots marbrés parce que ça ressemble à un conte de fées. Tous les dessins et toutes les images que j'ai vus montrent leur nid dans une souche d'un grand arbre, complètement recouvert de mousse et juste eux assis là. C'est un des plus beaux nids que j'ai vus. Comment se portent les Guillemots marbrés au Canada?

 

David Bradley  09:55

Pas très bien, malheureusement. Ils sont désignés espèce menacée sur la liste des espèces en péril. L'Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature les considère comme des espèces en danger. C'est parce que les populations ne se portent pas bien. Vous savez, le Canada compte environ un quart de la population mondiale. Je pense que la majorité se trouve sur la côte ouest des États-Unis. Mais la population canadienne ne se porte pas bien. Nous savons qu'elle est en déclin depuis un certain nombre d'années. Et beaucoup d'efforts ont été faits pour essayer de trouver ce que nous pouvons faire pour essayer de stopper ce déclin, mais sans succès, malheureusement, le déclin s’est poursuivi.

 

Andrea Gress  10:24

Vous avez mentionné que c’est une espèce très discrète. Comment pouvons-nous savoir l’état de leur population?

 

David Bradley  10:31

Eh bien, c'est une chose difficile à chiffrer. Je veux dire, vous pouvez les compter en mer, ce qui est quelque chose dans lequel nous espérons être plus impliqués. Cela a été beaucoup fait dans le passé. Et puis des chercheurs essaient d'attirer certains individus en utilisant la technologie radar. Ainsi, dans les fjords, ou sur la côte, où les oiseaux se rassemblent souvent avant de s'approcher des sites de nidification, on installe souvent des stations radar et on essaie de les compter à leur arrivée, ce qui permet de recenser la population. Mais bien sûr, nous ne savons pas exactement combien d'oiseaux sont là.

 

Andrea Gress  11:00

Et quels sont les principaux dangers qui les guettent?

 

David Bradley  11:02

Comme pour la plupart des oiseaux, c'est la perte d'habitat. Et comme leur habitat est constitué de forêts anciennes, leur habitat de reproduction, la perte de ces forêts est certainement la plus grande menace qui pèse sur eux. En fait, si vous regardez la réduction de l’étendue des forêts anciennes en Colombie-Britannique, au cours des 30 dernières années, la perte des forêts anciennes a été de 20 à 30%, ce qui correspond à la perte de la population de guillemots, ce qui est presque une correspondance parfaite. C'est une indication assez forte que c'est ce qui cause le déclin. Il existe aussi d'autres menaces. Vous savez, le mazoutage en mer est une grande menace pour les oiseaux pendant l'hiver, surtout lorsqu'ils ne se reproduisent pas. Les changements climatiques sont toujours une menace pour les populations d'oiseaux, principalement parce que beaucoup de leurs sites forestiers se réchauffent, ce qui rend difficile le maintien de ces plateformes de nidification moussues et humides. Nous savons également que la surpêche est un problème majeur, car les oiseaux se nourrissent de poissons-appâts. Ainsi, le capelan, par exemple, le petit hareng ou le saumon, les jeunes saumons. Une réduction des populations de ces espèces entraînerait une réduction de l'habitat. Donc une perte de proies pour le Guillemot marbré. Il y a donc un certain nombre de menaces qui pèsent sur cette espèce, principalement sur les forêts anciennes.

 

Andrés Jiménez  12:11

Contrairement au cas d'autres espèces dont nous avons parlé ici, comme l’Océanite cul-blanc et le Pluvier siffleur, dont le déclin des effectifs est attribuable à beaucoup de facteurs différents. Il y a un facteur assez clair qui explique la baisse de la population de Guillemots marbrés. Il s'agit de la coupe des forêts anciennes. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur le contexte de l'exploitation des forêts anciennes en Colombie-Britannique?

 

David Bradley  12:39

C'est une question litigieuse en Colombie-Britannique depuis de nombreuses décennies. À Haida Gwaii, il y a eu un certain nombre de protestations dans le passé au sujet de l'ampleur de l'exploitation des forêts anciennes. Et récemment, bien sûr, il y a eu une protestation assez forte contre cela qui a attiré beaucoup d'attention à l’échelle internationale. Les gens se rendent compte que la sauvegarde de ces forêts anciennes revêt une grande importance, non seulement pour des espèces comme le Guillemot marbré, mais aussi pour les invertébrés qui peuvent vivre dans ces forêts et pour les rapports culturels que les populations autochtones entretiennent avec ces forêts. Il s'agit donc d'une question très controversée en Colombie-Britannique. Le gouvernement provincial a été soumis à de fortes pressions pour mettre un frein à une grande partie de ces concessions forestières, mais ce n'est qu'un report temporaire de l’exploitation.

 

 

Andrés Jiménez  13:18

Chaque fois que je vous entends parler de la Colombie-Britannique, cela me rappelle les forêts tropicales du Costa Rica, avec ces arbres de 30 à 40 mètres de haut au tronc super épais, entièrement recouverts de mousse et d'épiphytes et pleins de vie. Et vous m'avez fourni une autre partie de l'image, à savoir le lien avec les peuples autochtones, et la façon dont les Haïdas sont liés à cette forêt ancienne, aux Guillemots marbrés, la façon dont les peuples autochtones utilisent les forêts anciennes, y vivent et en prennent soin. Est-ce que les Autochtones sont reliés aux efforts de conservation de cette espèce?

 

13:56

Il y a probablement des liens spirituels, mais je ne pense pas qu'il y ait des liens économiques ou de subsistance, il n'y a pas vraiment de preuve que les guillemots étaient largement consommés, principalement parce que l'espèce est assez insaisissable. Et il n'y a pas beaucoup de viande sur eux. Dans le passé, les guillemots n'ont donc pas été récoltés. Mais si vous regardez les plans de gestion, beaucoup de nations ont – en particulier les Haïdas, par exemple – c’est une indication claire que c'est une espèce importante sur le plan culturel parce qu'ils l'utilisent souvent comme ce qu’on appelle une espèce parapluie pour protéger, protéger la terre, et les guillemots constituent une importante espèce parapluie parce qu'ils englobent beaucoup de l'écosystème, non seulement eux-mêmes, mais aussi, comme je l'ai mentionné, les invertébrés et les espèces d'arbres qui pourraient pousser là, ils sont tous sous le même parapluie. Du point de vue de la conservation, c’est important, oui.

 

Andrea Gress  14:46

Oui, on protège une espèce et ça couvre tout un tas d'autres choses.

 

Andrés Jiménez  14:51

Dont les êtres humains. Est-ce que les peuples autochtones ont leur voix au chapitre en ce qui concerne les Guillemots marbrés?

 

David Bradley  14:58

Ils ont un lien très fort avec la terre et veulent absolument la protéger, les forêts anciennes, car elles ont une grande valeur pour eux.

 

Andrea Gress  15:05

Si tout se passait comme vous le souhaitez et que les Guillemots marbrés étaient entièrement protégés, cela aurait de nombreuses retombées positives, non? Par exemple, quels autres avantages verrions-nous?

 

David Bradley  15:15

Eh bien, beaucoup d'animaux ont besoin de ces forêts anciennes. Vous savez, vous regardez les grizzlis, par exemple, qui sont très importants pour les nations autochtones et pour le tourisme, par exemple, et une partie très importante de l'écosystème, ils seront protégés aussi par ces forêts anciennes. Il y a d'autres espèces aussi, comme le Petit-duc des montagnes. C'est un bon exemple d'utilisation des forêts anciennes. Et de nombreuses espèces de mammifères aiment aussi les forêts anciennes. Une autre bonne espèce est l'Autour des palombes, la sous-espèce que vous trouvez sur la côte ici; ils ont besoin de grands arbres matures. Ainsi, si nous protégeons les Guillemots marbrés en réduisant la perte de forêts anciennes, nous protégeons également un certain nombre d'autres espèces sur la côte.

 

Andrea Gress  15:56

Donc, pour que la conservation des Guillemots marbrés prenne vraiment son envol, qui seraient les principaux acteurs de ce processus?

 

David Bradley  16:06

Je pense qu’il est très important de travailler avec les populations autochtones. Il est donc important d'encourager la protection et la recherche sur les causes des pertes et sur les moyens de réduire ces pertes, de collaborer avec les Premières Nations à cet égard et, bien sûr, de mobiliser une grande partie de l'industrie de la pêche, car si elle récolte trop de poissons… Je ne dis pas qu’il faut dire aux pêcheurs quoi faire, mais les informer des problèmes. Et je sais que Pêches et Océans Canada, évidemment, suit cela de près. Et des organismes gouvernementaux, des agences, ainsi que le gouvernement fédéral, mais aussi le gouvernement provincial, examinent de très près cette question. Ils ont mis en place un plan de rétablissement du Guillemot marbré depuis un certain nombre d'années. Et donc ils sont vraiment en train d'accélérer la réduction de la perte de l'espèce, principalement dans les forêts anciennes que j'ai mentionnées auparavant. Donc c'est comme ça que nous pouvons répondre à la question, c'est en arrêtant de couper les arbres, d’éliminer l’habitat de l’espèce.

 

Andrea Gress  16:58

Ce sont des choses vraiment très importantes. Vous savez, la grosse industrie, les grands influenceurs. Mais chacune et chacun des citoyens, comment peuvent-ils venir en aide à l’espèce?

 

David Bradley  17:09

Oui, c'est une bonne question. Que peuvent faire les auditeurs maintenant pour protéger l’espèce? C'est une question litigieuse, comme je l'ai déjà dit; vous n'avez pas nécessairement à sortir et à protester, mais vous pouvez faire pression sur votre député local, ou votre député fédéral, ou quelque chose comme ça, leur écrire et leur dire ce que des oiseaux comme les Guillemots marbrés signifient pour vous, et ce qu'ils signifient vraisemblablement pour les groupes autochtones, et pourquoi ils devraient être protégés et pourquoi les forêts anciennes ne devraient pas être coupées, vous pouvez toujours faire ça. 

 

Andrés Jiménez  17:36

Vous nous avez raconté l'histoire de cette espèce qu’on voit rarement et qui passe beaucoup de temps dans l'océan et qui, bien sûr, entre en contact avec les engins de pêche et les marées noires. Et quand elle revient sur la côte, elle revient dans ce jardin féerique d'arbres géants pour nicher parmi la mousse. Et il y a une indication très claire que la coupe de ces arbres géants, bien sûr, va les affecter parce qu'ils n'auraient plus d'endroit pour nicher. Quelle est la principale leçon que cette espèce vous a enseignée et nous enseigne sur la façon dont nous faisons de la conservation, ou sur notre relation avec les espèces sauvages?

 

David Bradley  18:23

Je pense qu'un équilibre est important. Il est important de reconnaître qu'il y aura toujours des menaces, qu'il s'agisse des menaces de l'industrie forestière ou des menaces de l'exploitation des forêts. Et il est assez facile de dire «Arrêtez de faire ceci et faites cela.» Mais je pense qu'il suffit d'avoir un dialogue ouvert et une discussion sur les moyens de protéger la culture et de protéger l'économie tout en protégeant les oiseaux et la forêt sans détruire l'une de ces choses. C'est un problème auquel le gouvernement est confronté depuis de très nombreuses décennies. Donc si c'était facile, ils l'auraient déjà fait.

 

Andrés Jiménez  18:59

Andrea, qu’en pensez-vous? Que retenez-vous de tout cela?

 

Andrea Gress  19:02

Ce qui est vraiment intéressant avec cette espèce, c'est que vous avez mentionné qu'on ne savait pas qu'elle faisait son nid dans les arbres avant les années 1960 et 1970. Et cela me fait penser à ces grands écosystèmes dont nous pensons tout connaître, mais que nous ne connaissons peut-être pas tant que ça. Il y a potentiellement beaucoup de choses qui se passent que nous ne comprenons pas complètement. Et lorsque nous travaillons à la protection d'une espèce, nous faisons probablement beaucoup plus pour cet écosystème que nous ne le réalisons.

 

Andrés Jiménez  19:28

Dans mon cas, David vient de faire une citation, une phrase qui m'a vraiment fait réaliser. Il a dit: «C’est assez facile de dire "Arrêtez de faire ceci et faites cela."» J'y ai pensé de nombreuses fois. J'ai dit «Ne faites pas ça» quand il s'agit d'une question de conservation. Mais c'est très difficile quand vous êtes une personne qui dépend de l'exploitation forestière pour survivre. Et cela me fait penser que l’enjeu est clair, que nous connaissons le problème qui menace cette espèce et que la réponse peut être aussi claire. Mais c'est si difficile à résoudre, si difficile à faire que j'espère que beaucoup de gens qui nous écoutent réfléchiront à la façon dont ils consomment le bois et les produits du bois, à la façon d’acheter du bois qui fait l’objet d’une gestion durable et à la façon dont nous soutenons les communautés qui sont liées à ces produits pour qu'elles puissent gagner leur vie.

 

David Bradley  20:24

Oui, vous avez mentionné un point très, très important, Andrés, vous savez, s'assurer que les produits du bois que vous achetez sont certifiés comme étant les fruits d’une pratique de récolte durable. Et d'une certaine manière, c'est une ressource renouvelable, plutôt que de couper les arbres anciens, ce n'est pas vraiment une ressource renouvelable, il faut tellement de temps pour qu'ils poussent, plus longtemps que la vie de la plante pour repousser, parce que tout l'écosystème doit se reformer, pas seulement l'arbre lui-même. Cela peut donc prendre beaucoup de temps pour les remplacer. Si vous achetez des produits du bois, qu'il s'agisse de tables ou de papier, par exemple, essayez d'en trouver qui proviennent de sources durables. Acheter des produits des forêts anciennes, acheter des produits fabriqués à partir de forêts anciennes n'est pas une bonne chose.

 

Andrea Gress  21:09

Merci infiniment d’avoir répondu à notre invitation, David. J'ai adoré en apprendre davantage sur cette espèce. Et j'espère qu'un jour, je pourrai aller en Colombie-Britannique et faire une excursion en bateau avec vous. Et on pourrait pister quelques individus.

 

David Bradley  21:18

Absolument. Oui, il y a un bon nombre de guillemots. En fait, si vous venez dans mon coin, ils ne sont pas faciles à trouver à Vancouver, il faut aller plus loin. Mais je peux vous y amener si vous venez par chez nous.

 

Andrés Jiménez  21:25

Pourriez-vous me montrer des ours, quant à y être?

 

David Bradley  21:29

Oh, c'est délicat. Je suis sûr que si on va plus au nord, dans la partie nord de la mer des Salish, on peut trouver des ours. Oui.

 

Andrea Gress  21:34

Alors, c’est sur ma liste.

 

Andrés Jiménez  21:35

Merci, David.

 

David Bradley  21:36

Je vous en prie, c’était un plaisir.

 

Andrea Gress  21:40

Avant de partir, je voulais juste prendre un moment pour remercier un de nos auditeurs. Nous venons de recevoir un commentaire vraiment génial. Je vais le lire à haute voix parce que je l'adore. Voici ce que mentionne la personne: «J'aime le contenu canadien. Dans ce balado. L'épisode sur l’aménagement d'un jardin pour attirer les oiseaux a été le coup de pouce dont j'avais besoin pour enlever une partie de la pelouse de ma cour avant et ajouter quelques plantes pour les oiseaux. Aujourd'hui, j'ai planté un cornouiller stolonifère, une ancolie du Canada, une verge d'or rigide et quelques espèces d’herbes de prairie indigènes. J'ai hâte de voir qui se présentera à mes mangeoires l'an prochain.»

 

Ah, quel commentaire incroyable. Merci beaucoup à son auteur. Et s'il vous plaît, tout le monde, si vous avez eu une influence positive sur les oiseaux dans votre vie grâce à notre balado ou à tout autre programme ou bénévolat dans lequel vous êtes impliqué, faites-le nous savoir, nous voulons prendre connaissance de vos commentaires sur les médias sociaux. Laissez des commentaires sur vos plateformes de baladodiffusion. Abonnez-vous, toutes ces bonnes choses. Cela nous aide vraiment à faire vivre ce balado et à maintenir le soutien. Alors, merci. J'espère recevoir d'autres beaux récits comme celui-là.